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Mad Scientess Jane Expat

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Deeds of Derring-Do | Full of Wild Inaccuracies and Exaggerations

Newsflash: Supposedly Smart Woman Behaves Foolishly, Pays Price [20081119|09:33]
Mad Scientess Jane Expat
[the weather today is |unimpressed, ill]

Did you know that drugging yourself up and continuing to go to work doesn't constitute looking after yourself properly when you're ill?

Amazing.

Addendum: Will an English person please explain the use of the word "chicken" as a term of endearment?
linkReply

Comments:
[User Picture]From: opheliablue
2008-11-19 11:04 (UTC)

More Information Than You Wanted

Never fear, I'm on the case.

I found a few forums where 'chicken' is used as a term of endearment but it didn't explain why. What I can say is that 'hen' is used in Scotland as a term of endearment.

But anyway, then I found this and I trust this will answer your question:

"In Shakespeare's times, "chuck" was indeed a term of endearment. The use of "chuck" to express affection appears considerably less strange when translated to modern English: "Chuck" is an ancient variant of "chicken", which can be easily understood as a word expressing endearment still today. Knowing that, the term "sweet chuck" explains itself.

The word is listed in "The Hallamshire Glossary" by Joseph Hunter (1811) as follows:

"CHUCK. This word has various significations, not referable to the same root. It is a chicken; a term of endearment: 'Be innocent of the
knowledge, dearest chuck / Till thou applaud the deed.' Macbeth, III.2."

It is similarly explained in a 1793 edition of "Love's Labour's Lost":

"chuck, i.e. chicken; an ancient term of endearment. So, in 'Macbeth': 'Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck-'"

The term has not even completely vanished, according to Michael Quinion, who wrote in 2003:

"It survives as an endearment in some parts of Britain today, such as Yorkshire and Liverpool, the latter having the vowel pronounced to my
ear part-way towards chook (and I'm told that chook is known from various dialects)."
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[User Picture]From: chickenfeet2003
2008-11-19 11:31 (UTC)

Re: More Information Than You Wanted

"duck" is also used as an endearment in the Nottingham area
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[User Picture]From: opheliablue
2008-11-19 12:21 (UTC)

Re: More Information Than You Wanted

Photobucket

heehee! I'm on the lookout for other ones now.
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2008-11-19 18:21 (UTC)
I've heard "ducks" before, but not the singular. I wonder which conveys more affection?
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2008-11-19 18:25 (UTC)
This supports the theory that most idioms in the English language have either biblical or Shakespearean origins. Except for the ones on the internet, which all originate with either crazed hormonal teenagers or bored geeks.

I heard "chicken" whilst in Leeds, but it was spoken by a southerner so I didn't get to hear the dialect, boo.
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[User Picture]From: opheliablue
2008-11-20 10:28 (UTC)
ZOMG!!!111!!!!1 LOL

WTF do u mean?

brb
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[User Picture]From: nimoloth
2008-11-20 11:58 (UTC)

Re: More Information Than You Wanted

Hen is just a general term for a girl/woman in Scotland - not an endearment in particular. Irritating when used by strangers, usually little Glasgow grannies, or taxi drivers.
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[User Picture]From: opheliablue
2008-11-20 13:19 (UTC)

Re: More Information Than You Wanted

Yes - my bad. I know that really. I am Scottish, I was born there, my family are all Scottish. 30 years of living in London has played havoc, not only with my accent, but my knowledge of particular words used there.

All bus drivers in Troon use the word 'hen' - and some cafe owners, but not all of them.
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[User Picture]From: nimoloth
2008-11-20 13:31 (UTC)

Re: More Information Than You Wanted

And Troon's supposed to be the posh bit of Ayrshire!
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[User Picture]From: opheliablue
2008-11-20 15:20 (UTC)

Re: More Information Than You Wanted

hehe... Troon, small though it is, is divided into parts. I think you get fined if you cross from one part to the other. My mum grew up in the poor part - very unposh. My dad moved there in his teens, to the Posh part, which may explain why his parents disapproved of my mum so much, although they would probably have disapproved of her anyway.

They must have owed quite a lot in fines by the time they moved away. I don't know if they paid them or not.
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[User Picture]From: opheliablue
2008-11-19 11:04 (UTC)
p.s. I hope you feel better chicken.
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2008-11-19 18:22 (UTC)
Thank you, duck.

For some reason, staying home all day and resting made me feel worse. WTF.
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[User Picture]From: opheliablue
2008-11-20 10:32 (UTC)
You're welcome, hen.

I'm sorry, I don't understand what 'WTF' means - is it teh language of teh internets?

(I swear I didn't put this user icon in my icons....WTF? ooops, forgot I don't know what that means. It did, however, amuse me.)
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[User Picture]From: girl_onthego
2008-11-19 12:40 (UTC)
Re: drugs and illness, that is so going around at the moment. Boooo.
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2008-11-19 18:27 (UTC)
I feel worse after having spent the day working from bed, so I'm kinda feeling like, screw it, I may as well go to work tomorrow.
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[User Picture]From: girl_onthego
2008-11-19 19:03 (UTC)
Well I think the key is NOT to work from bed all day, but to actually rest. But that may just be my crazy brain.
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[User Picture]From: lesyeuxouverts
2008-11-19 14:23 (UTC)
It's up there with 'Sausage' on the list of incomprehensible food-items-as-endearments. Dan's gran up near Birmingham called me Chick if that makes more sense ?
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2008-11-19 18:28 (UTC)
Sausage! I have heard that one from the bloke. He has about fifty different names for me, and "silly sausage" is definitely amongst them. "Chick" makes a bit more sense than "chicken", as it invokes tiny soft fluffiness.
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[User Picture]From: namey
2008-11-19 15:12 (UTC)
There's a "secret herbs and spices" joke, but I ain't goin' there.
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2008-11-19 18:29 (UTC)
Aw, go on.
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From: secretsquirrel7
2008-11-19 17:25 (UTC)
Fascinating. Well, that sort of explains the devolution to the American use of the word "chick".

You should go home and rest! Do you not have paid sick leave?
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2008-11-19 18:34 (UTC)
I do have paid sick leave, I just hate using it. :-P In this country it doesn't count against my other holiday time, which is a concept I still have a lot of trouble getting my head round.
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From: secretsquirrel7
2008-11-19 18:55 (UTC)
I'm a unionized employee of the State of Washington, it doesn't count against my normal vacation, either. ...And my sick leave never expires or caps off at a certain amount of hours. One of my co-workers has over 1800 hours (damn near a year, which is 2080 hours) of paid sick leave accrued and still available over the 22 years he's been here at the college.

I do feel guilty for using it, unless I'm on death's door, but guilt has never *really* stopped me.
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[User Picture]From: nimoloth
2008-11-20 11:54 (UTC)
You have to take sick days as holidays in other places? That's so unfair!
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[User Picture]From: sanat
2008-11-19 18:59 (UTC)
Understandable, duck. I've had bruisy-achey bellyaching coming and going since Monday morning, but for lack of other symptoms I continue going to work and just living on fruit and fluids. Hope nothing bursts due to my lackadaisacality.
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2008-11-21 10:43 (UTC)
I mowed through most of a tub of blueberries in two days. I am convinced they will cure me.
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[User Picture]From: nimoloth
2008-11-20 11:53 (UTC)
I guess it's just an extension of "chick", which is (somewhat 80s) term for a cute girl.
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2008-11-21 10:44 (UTC)
I heard "chicken" being used on children. It seems ironic to use a longer word on a smaller human, but hey, that's English for you - illogical!
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