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Mad Scientess Jane Expat

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Ars Moriendi [20060420|16:51]
Mad Scientess Jane Expat
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Memento Mori


I think I admire Banksy in part because he quickly grasped not only the futility of trying to prevent others from stealing or copying your work but also the danger involved in attaching your identity to it once you've shared it. Unless you let go of it completely, or create a false persona to which it can be attached, you set yourself up to have your judgment twisted by others. Creative work takes time and energy, so unless you have another means by which to make a living that doesn't completely sap you, or you have a patron, a visual artist can't afford this luxury. If you have it, you should take it, or it's very likely that your passion will be crushed by your ego. By relinquishing your identity, you can die while you're still alive.
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: opheliablue
2006-04-20 16:22 (UTC)
Wow. That really gives me some kind of chill everytime I look at it and read the bit underneath. I love it. And it's so true.
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[User Picture]From: scanner_darkly
2006-04-20 16:32 (UTC)
Wow, that's a very insightful thought about creativity. There are forces in the little weird professional horror fiction circle that go absolutely bugfuck about copying and copyrights -- and that bit about identity and wrapping yourself up in your art is all too true. That's one of the reasons why it's been five years, and I still haven't finished my novel: it's me and I have no desire to show off some flawed version of me to the world (the depressive in me says, I'm already flawed enough), but I'm not sure how to make it perfect.

Thanks.
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2006-04-25 08:36 (UTC)
Well, in French an orgasm is "the little death," right? So maybe Arse More-endy isn't necessarily a wrong-headed interpretation, depending on one's proclivities. ;-D
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From: tdj
2006-04-20 18:17 (UTC)
All that picture needs is a rat (which is what I thought the darker stone was, at first).
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[User Picture]From: omniana
2006-04-20 18:30 (UTC)
perhaps graffiti it in, Banksy style?
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From: tdj
2006-04-21 19:45 (UTC)
Or befriend a rat?
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[User Picture]From: omniana
2006-04-23 16:51 (UTC)
Put it as a backdrop to your rat cage. Brilliant.
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2006-04-25 08:40 (UTC)
"There will always be another rat. Now: onward. Things to do. People to damage." -- Mr. Croup
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[User Picture]From: omniana
2006-04-20 18:54 (UTC)
When I was in senior in college and not sure if I should do science or maybe pursue art, a wise professor advised me that if I'm meant to be an artist, then I will have no choice in the matter. I'm not an artist. I like the idea that art is something that your being has to create, but once expressed you don't own it any more than your breath. Realistically, I have that sense of ownership you spoke of, but I agree, it's best to let that go. Your comments remind me of the Buddhist idea of nonattachment. Difficult to accomplish, but wise.
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2006-04-25 08:57 (UTC)
I've always been of the opinion that most of our limitations are self-imposed. If you decide you're bad at maths, that's a choice. I mean, I don't discount the notion that there may be some genetic predisposition towards certain types of learning, but for the most part, I think people don't give themselves much of a chance to explore before making a lasting judgment on their abilities and shutting doors on themselves. (I'm including myself in that tendency as well, btw.)

I think that the most internal satisfaction is derived from the act of creation. Once a piece is finished, the first thing I want to do is show it to someone, of course. But as soon as I do that, my level of satisfaction acquires dependencies. Sometimes that can be very positive, if someone has a lot of enthusiasm for the work or even if they have some helpful criticism. Since I don't get to choose the way that other people react, it's probably better to simply let that go and focus on enjoying the process of creation. It goes against all the whisperings of ego and the typical notion of success, which usually involves widespread recognition and acknowledgment by others.
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[User Picture]From: returntosender
2006-04-20 19:08 (UTC)
I think the green tinge of the moss adds something to it.

You make an excellent point, and I think I'm going to have a little think about it.
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[User Picture]From: nanila
2006-04-25 09:01 (UTC)
I'm glad you like it, thank you.

If you want to talk about it next time we meet up, that would be excellent.
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